Kosovo

IEEFA Research

Coal Won’t Solve the Energy Poverty Problem

Times Have Changed; Old Electricity-Generation Models Don’t Work Anymore

Coal-fired electricity is no longer the economy builder its proponents say it is. Time was when coal in fact did contribute to growth in many economies, but times have changed. Today governments and private interests worldwide concede—even emphasize—the economic and environmental dysfunction of coal. We’ve just published an IEEFA Briefing Note (“Energy Poverty, Then and […]

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The World Bank’s Bad Energy-Policy Call in Kosovo

The Wrong Move at the Wrong Time for a Small Country in Eastern Europe

We’ve just published a study concluding that the proposed coal-fired New Kosovo Power Plant—if it’s built—would increase electricity prices by as much as 50 percent in Kosovo and damage the economy of the small country. The study, “The Proposed New Kosovo Power Plant: An Unnecessary Burden at an Unreasonable Price,” ( also see Albanian version) urges the […]

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More News and Commentary

The World Bank’s Errant Investment in Kosovo Coal-Fired Project

Karl Mathiesen for The Guardian: A 2011 World Bank report concluded that Kosovo’s growing energy demand could only be fulfilled cost-effectively by new coal. The country is bypassed by the great gas pipelines that flow into Europe from Azerbaijan, Russia and north Africa. Critics from Kosid, a local civil society alliance, have attacked the report […]

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IEEFA Europe: Western Balkans Take a Step Away From Coal Power, and Toward the EU

Albania, Croatia and Kosovo Have Made Tentative Moves in Just the Past Week or So Toward Greener, More Integrated Electricity Markets

Albania, Croatia and Kosovo have made tentative steps in just the past week or so toward greener and more integrated market-driven electricity networks. We have argued before that the introduction of competitive electricity markets, coupled with greater cross-border connections and renewable power, is the way forward for the Western Balkans. Such an approach will help […]

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Obstacles to Building Renewable Power in Kosovo Are Political, Not Technical

The Government of Kosovo, World Bank and Obama Administration Are Using Misleading Information to Attack Renewable Energy Potential; New Projects are Behind Schedule

Proponents of building a new coal-fired power plant in Kosovo have argued that the plant is needed because Kosovo has very limited ability to support a significant build out of wind and solar power resources. But a closer look at the situation shows that the obstacles to renewable energy development in Kosovo are more political […]

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A Test Now for the Western Balkans: Adhere to the Past or Embrace a New Energy Economy?



Entrenched Interests Are Ignoring a Crucial Stepping-Stone Toward EU Membership 


Emerging still from the civil wars that followed the collapse of Yugoslavia a generation ago, the six countries of the Western Balkans today face an unprecedented energy-policy moment. The essential question facing Albania, Bosnia, Kosovo, Macedonia and Montenegro, and Serbia: Whether to adhere to a costly coal-fired electricity-generation past or embrace the new global energy […]

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Renewables Would Be a Far Cheaper Way to Power Kosovo Than What the World Bank Wants to Do

Research Shows Little Justification for a New Coal-Fired Project

A preponderance of evidence supports our view that renewable energy would be cheaper and cleaner than the proposed coal-fired New Kosovo Power Plant. Research we’ve looked at (including by Lazard, Agora Energiewinde, and the International Renewable Energy Agency) covers energy markets in well over 20 nations and makes clear that the cost of electricity generated […]

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The New Kosovo Power Plant: An Unnecessary Burden at an Unreasonable Cost (Update)

World Bank’s Estimates for Electricity Demand Are Well Off the Mark; Renewable Commitments and Energy-Efficiency Plans Render Proposed Coal-Fired Plant Redundant

Today we’re revisiting a report we issued several weeks ago questioning the economic viability of a proposed new coal-fired electricity plant in Kosovo. The project stands to damage the economy of the country but the World Bank, the U.S. State Department, USAID and the Treasury Department support the “New Kosovo Power Plant,” or NKPP, nonetheless. […]

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IEEFA Data Bite: Coal Dependency in Kosovo Is More Extreme Than in the World’s Biggest Coal-Burning Countries

The World Bank and the U.S. Government, by Supporting Expansion of a Status Quo Energy Model in the Balkans, Are Putting an Entire National Economy at Risk

Kosovo relied on coal for 97 percent of its electricity generation in 2013, according to the most recent data from the International Energy Agency, and its dependency hasn’t improved much (if at all) since then. Of the 12 biggest coal-burning countries in the world, none rely on it as intensely as Kosovo does. Only South […]

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World Bank Says It Will Ramp Up Investments in Clean Energy

By Lalit K. Jha in The Wire:   The World Bank has unveiled an ambitious climate action plan that will help developing countries add 30 gigawatts of renewable energy, bring early warning systems to a hundred million people and develop climate-smart agriculture investment plans for at least 40 nations. The target for achieving this is 2020, […]

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Questions Around World Bank, U.S. Support for Regressive Electricity Project in Kosovo

Keith Johnson for Foreign Policy: Almost everyone agrees that Kosovo, home to 1.8 million people and one of the highest unemployment rates in Europe, desperately needs more energy. The question is how to generate it without doing more damage to a country already battling terrifying levels of pollution — and facing a tough choice between […]

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Coal Won’t Solve the Energy Poverty Problem

Times Have Changed; Old Electricity-Generation Models Don’t Work Anymore

Coal-fired electricity is no longer the economy builder its proponents say it is. Time was when coal in fact did contribute to growth in many economies, but times have changed. Today governments and private interests worldwide concede—even emphasize—the economic and environmental dysfunction of coal. We’ve just published an IEEFA Briefing Note (“Energy Poverty, Then and […]

Read More →